Tag Archives: horse shelter

Information on horse shelters including the different types of shelters for horses from Klene Pipe Structures, creator of the Hay Saver Hay Feeder for horses and cattle.

Wrangler Run In Horse Shelters

Preparing Your Horse for Warm Weather

The temperatures are rising, the sun’s out, and we don’t have to worry about the snow anymore. Spring and summer are on their way! Without proper preparation, warmer weather can lead to dehydration, lethargy, and added stress for your horse. As the weather continues to get nicer, here are some tips and reminders for getting your horse re-acclimated to the warmer temperatures. 

  1. Take it Slow – Your horse just spent several months taking it easy as we waited out the cold winter. The worst thing you can do is jump right back into the saddle (literally) and expect to train as usual. Slowly incorporate more riding time throughout the next few weeks. The heat can be especially fatiguing even without physical activity involved. It is important to monitor your horse to ensure they acclimate to the physical activity and the heat well before increasing riding time. 
  1. Prepare for Bugs – Everyone likes being outside when the weather is nice, including bugs. Besides being annoying, insects can carry diseases and irritate your horses. Make sure to treat outdoor horse shelters and portable shade structures for insects to keep them away. 
  1. Provide Shade – If your horses are outside most of the day, provide some form of shade for them to escape the hot sun. Run-in shelters and portable shade structures are great ways to offer shade for your horses away from the barn. Run-in shelters are also great at keeping your horses dry during spring showers and summer rain.    
  1. Electrolytes and Cold Water – Make sure you are changing their water frequently as it can warm easily in the sun. Not only do horses not like warm water, but it can also pose health concerns if left for too long. Make sure you provide them with cool drinking water that is easily accessible. Drinking water isn’t enough to maintain healthy horses when the temperatures are hot. Make sure to provide a source of electrolytes, too, like a salt block for added minerals.   

Even if you follow all these tips, make sure to closely monitor your horses in hot weather as heat stroke can sneak up on them. If you are concerned that your horse could be suffering from heat-related issues, bring your horse into a cooler environment and contact your vet. 

Horse standing under a run in shelter in the winter

Protecting Your Horse from the Elements 

Whether it is the dead of winter or peak summer, protecting your horse from harsh weather is important for their overall health and well-being. Here are some preventative measures you can take to keep your horse healthy when the weather isn’t great, along with things to look out for during the winter and summer months:

  • Horse Shelter Kits: Give your horse protection from the elements with a horse shelter kit. In the summer, it provides much-needed shade from the hot sun, and in the winter, it protects them from hail, snow, and rain. Whether you choose a portable shade or a run-in shelter, you can ensure that your horse is protected from unruly weather. 

  • Horse Hoods, Turnout Blankets, and Coats: When the temperatures drop and it starts to snow, consider putting on extra layers for your horse. Although they have a natural coat that thickens in the month leading up to winter, they may still need extra layers to stay warm and dry. 

  • Sun Cream for Horses: Horses with lighter pink or white skin on their nose and face are more prone to sun damage in the summertime. Along with a shade structure, like a horse shelter kit, sun cream can help protect your horse’s skin from sunburn. 

  • Fly Protectants in the Warmer Months: When the weather gets warmer and the sun comes out, so do the flies. Although flies might seem like a mere annoyance, they can transmit disease to your horse, cause welts and skin irritation, and even cause damage to your horse’s hooves from aggressive stomping. Using a mix of fly repellent, like citronella, and leg bands can help keep flies away from your horses. 

  • Keep Your Horse Hydrated: Dehydration is a big problem in the summer, but did you know that the winter can be just as dangerous to keep your horse hydrated? Horses get a lot of their hydration from grazing on moist pastures in the fall and spring, but that moisture is gone in the summer and winter.
    • Summer- Just like humans, horses sweat when they overheat which, on its own, can lead to dehydration. But water can grow algae when it is hot outside, making it taste different, which means your horse may not drink it. To avoid this, make sure you are cleaning their trough regularly and checking it for debris. Also, make sure that the water is cool to encourage your horse to drink from it. 
    • Winter- Keeping your horse hydrated in the winter poses its own challenges. Water troughs are prone to freezing and horses don’t enjoy ice-cold water, especially when it is already cold outside. Make sure automatic pumps aren’t frozen so water can circulate. Adding a few apples can also help keep water from freezing thanks to the bobbing motion. Adding salt or electrolytes to their food can also encourage them to drink more water, but consult your veterinarian before doing so regularly. 

Knowing how to spot signs of distress, dehydration, or discomfort when the weather changes is vital for maintaining your horse’s health. Having the right tools at your disposal helps you avoid the consequences of bad weather and sets you up for success come summer or winter. Along with the tips above, adding a horse shelter kit is a great way to protect your horse from bad weather. 

portable shade for horses

The Importance of Shade and Shelter for Your Horse

Giving your horse the opportunity to get shade and shelter from the elements helps to keep them healthy and happy. Wind, sun, and issues with weather can leave horses vulnerable to getting sick or hurt. That’s why the use of a shelter for your horse is so important.

Equine Wellness Magazine has outlined a number of items that should be considered when deciding on purchasing a horse shelter including where to place it on your property. When determining where to place a horse shelter, they discuss the importance of looking at weather patterns as well as the landscape for best protection. In addition, they write that having a sturdy and portable structure is ideal for best protection. You can read the full article here.

Klene Pipe offers many different shelter options for horses, cattle and livestock. Our run-in shelters are some of the toughest frames you will find. In addition, our portable shade and our portable shade kits offer protection from the sun in the hot summer months.

Be sure you are taking the proper precautions to keep your horses safe during the upcoming summer months by giving them the opportunity to get out of the elements. Shelters for horses are a must-have for protecting their well-being.

Wrangler Run In Horse Shelters

What You Should Know About Run-In Shelters

Given the constantly changing weather, it is important for horse owners to find a means of shelter that will protect their horses from rain, wind and snow, and provide them with a place to find ample shade.

Run-in shelters are an effective and convenient solution to provide the shelter you’re looking for, giving your horse a place to stay year-round, no matter the weather conditions.

Run-in shelters are visually appealing barns and sheds, which are built to be weatherproof and long-lasting. However, positioning of these sheds can oftentimes be a task on its own. You have to keep in mind winter winds, summer sun, drainage, general environment, and of course, convenience.

You’ll want to make sure your shed is facing away from prevailing winds to prevent ice, sleet and snow from blowing inside. This also is standard positioning for warm, summer months. Facing the shed away from the sun will not only shade your horses, but also help with flies and other bugs.

When it comes to rain and melting snow, especially if your shed is on the side of a natural slope, be sure to find a way to direct water away from the shed to avoid flooding and other messes.

Horses in the Heat

5 Steps on How to Take Care of Your Horse in Heat

Although summer is wrapping up, these later summer months can often be some of the hottest. Heat can be dangerous for horses resulting in dehydration, lethargy, malaise, stress and even colic.

It’s important to know the right steps to take when looking after your horses during the warmer months. Consider these five useful tips to prevent heat exhaustion and other trauma to your horses in the heat:

  1. Provide Shade Seems obvious enough, but if your horse grazes outdoors or must be outside during the day, provide some sort of relief from the sun. Whether that be a  horse shade shelter or some other source. Sure, trees are a source of shade, but as the sun moves, so will the shade. Choosing cooler turnout times is another way to prevent your horse from being in the heat for too long. If your horse has a stall, but is turned out for part of the day, provide turnout during the cooler hours – preferably nighttime if at all possible.
  1. Mist Your Horse Misting systems for horses are extremely beneficial. As moisture is absorbed from the horse’s skin, it takes away some of the heat. Frequent mistings are far more effective than one single dousing of a horse.
  1. Provide an Electrolyte Source Your horse should be provided fresh, cool water throughout the day. Buckets that hang off of a fence get warm and don’t appeal to the horses. If left long enough, the water can actually become unhealthy. Providing a salt block can help the water stay laced with electrolytes that help keep its body in balance. However, not all horses drink electro-laced water, so be sure to provide another source of water to ensure they’ll stay drinking.
  1. Slow Down If you work your horse in the heat, lighten the work or spread it out over a series of shorter sessions than you would normally – especially when humidity levels are high. There’s no need to truck through a days’ worth of work in the heat. It’s not safe for you, or the horse and you don’t want to spread yourself too thin.
  1. Stick to a Schedule Within the parameters of keeping your horse cool, stay as close as possible to their normal schedules. Throwing off their routine schedule can add confusion and imbalance. Too much change at once can be an invitation for a colic.

If you are concerned that your horse is suffering from a heat stroke, heat exhaustion or other heat-related stress, call your veterinarian immediately and get your horse into a safer, cooler environment.